12/21/16

An analysis of “At the End of the Mechanical Age” by Donald Barthelme

The story is at its heart a lament for the end of the mechanical age and a critical examination of the superficiality and commercialism that typified that period of history. The story is broken into four parts the first two each contain a separate song. The first song is sung by the protagonist and the second by his companion Mrs. Davis. The second two parts concern the marriage of the protagonist (Tom) and his companion and the last part their eventual divorce. The characters both celebrate the Read more [...]
11/20/16

Movie Review: Arrival

  WARNING SPOILERS AHEAD There's a point early on in Denis Villeneuve's Arrival  where a team of scientists and soldiers, entering the alien vessel for the first time, hike through a tunnel until they reach  the seeming end of it. One character tosses a Glo-Stick up in the air....and it continues to fall upwards. It is at this point that we realize we have entered, to quote Walter Pidgeon's Professor Morbius in Forbidden Planet (like Amy Adam's character, a professor of languages ), a Read more [...]
11/12/14

Movie Review: THE CONGRESS

At one point early in THE CONGRESS, the agent (Harvey Kietel) for the lead character tells a studio head "No science fiction films. They're all stupid and my client doesn't do stupid stuff." We laugh knowingly because at its very best, science fiction is the most intelligent and provocative of genres, and THE CONGRESS is a noble attempt to make a science fiction film that appeals to art-house audiences, something that has become more popular as of late (see also UPSTREAM COLOR and I ORIGINS). There Read more [...]
11/6/14

Movie Review: Zombeavers

ZOMBEAVERS follows a direct line of descent from such 1950s films as THE KILLER SHREWS and ATTACK OF THE GIANT LEECHES, although I doubt that the makers of this movie have seen them unless they are also fans of MYSTERY SCIENCE THEATER 3000. Instead, it's more likely that they were inspired by the tributes to such films made by those who grew up with them, such as Ron Underwood's TREMORS, Fred Dekker's NIGHT OF THE CREEPS and especially, Joe Dante's oeuvre, particularly PIRANHA, THE HOWLING and Read more [...]
08/1/14

I LOATHED LUCY

Quick, what does this remind you of? Lucy is a naïve American college student living in Hong Kong, emotionally fragile and seemingly none too bright, who has made the wrong sort of boyfriend, the sort who “innocently” asks you to deliver a briefcase to some fellows who “just happen” to be some big-time Asian drug dealers. And they don't just take the briefcase, no siree, they brutalize the poor woman before cutting her open and implanting its contents-bags filled with a new synthetic drug Read more [...]
04/20/14

Dissecting Divergent

  Entertaining yet not quite fulfilling, intelligent but underdeveloped, and having provoked an extremely broad range of critical reaction without any clear consensus, Divergent certainly lives up to its title in terms of both its internal contradictions and audience reception. It's enjoyable enough to merit a viewing and it provides an intriguing fictional society and setting that feels genuinely lived-in. Additionally, the social factions that form the crux of the story's plot and themes Read more [...]
03/31/14

Movie Review: Science At Work

The late, great Frederick Pohl opened Chasing Science, his wonderful memoir of scientific tourism, with an account of his visits to America's national laboratories. Although the majority work under heavy security there is one lab, as Pohl notes, that always welcomes visitors with open arms: Fermilab in DuPage County, Illinois. It is there that the Top Quark was discovered, solidifying the Standard Model and establishing it firmly as the touchstone of modern physics, and it remained the country's Read more [...]
02/23/14

Movie Review: Mood Indigo

Some movies bend the rules or try to break them. This movie stretches them, squeezes them, then shapes them until it has formed its own set of narrative and visual rules. It is a film that could only be made in France, and even then, only by Michel Gondry. Of course it has cinematic antecedents of its own, almost all Gallic in origin as well; it feels at times that we are watching a three-way collaboration between the great talents of Jean Cocteau, Rene Clair and Jacques Tati. All the same, it belongs Read more [...]
02/10/14

Movie Review: The Double

The doppelganger myth is a venerable one that has frequently surfaced in literature and occasionally in the movies. The most famous cinematic treatment was probably one of the earliest (if one excludes the many trick films that duplicated their actors), The Student of Prague, and the legend also provided Roger Moore with one of his better parts in little-seen sleeper The Man Who Haunted Himself. Surprisingly, the premise seems to have occurred more frequently on television, possibly because it lends Read more [...]
11/12/13

Movie Review: Escape From Tomorrow

My mother and sister were once trapped for two and a half hours in the “It's A Small World” attraction at Disney World. I hadn't a clue what their ordeal was like until I suffered through Escape From Tomorrow, which at least was an hour shorter . This is the type of movie that gets so much attention for the story behind its production and its so-called “audacity” that the poor quality of the finished product becomes almost irrelevant. Roy Abramsohn, a sort of poor man's Steven Carrell, is Read more [...]