12/30/15

Zombie Amalgamation: Origins of the Modern Revenant

The idea of the reanimated corpse shambles along the pages of history, and even before there were written records the undead were with us. The modern iteration of the zombie is not one of these creatures, but it is something new. A revenant fueled on modern fears of infection, and mass hysteria, while birthed from the ancient fear of reanimated corpses. The power of the modern zombie comes from the persistent fear of disease and infection. This infection is then paired with different social, economic, Read more [...]
11/6/14

Movie Review: Zombeavers

ZOMBEAVERS follows a direct line of descent from such 1950s films as THE KILLER SHREWS and ATTACK OF THE GIANT LEECHES, although I doubt that the makers of this movie have seen them unless they are also fans of MYSTERY SCIENCE THEATER 3000. Instead, it's more likely that they were inspired by the tributes to such films made by those who grew up with them, such as Ron Underwood's TREMORS, Fred Dekker's NIGHT OF THE CREEPS and especially, Joe Dante's oeuvre, particularly PIRANHA, THE HOWLING and Read more [...]
10/20/14

Classic Horror As It Was Meant To Be Seen.

Two years ago, Cineplex Odeon played a pair of Universal horror classics, Tod Browning's DRACULA and James Whale's FRANKENSTEIN, as part of its Classic Film Series. While I can watch Whale's film (and the rest of his horror output) countless times without exhaustion, Browning's version of the Bram Stoker novel had always been for me and many others quite a chore to watch. Made while the film industry was still undergoing growing pains in the transition to sound, it always seemed  too slow and static, Read more [...]
05/7/13

Ancient Curse, Modern Cure: The Horror of Victorian Sexual Repression

  The social aspects of nineteenth century Gothic horror are a study in the dichotomous nature of the Victorian mind. This period, characterized by its sexual repression, gave rise to some very salacious fiction, especially of the horror variety.  Early in the century The Second Great Awakening had renewed religious fervor in both Europe and America. This is juxtaposed against eighteenth century cultural trends that had seen great strides towards intellectual, scientific, and sexual enlightenment. Read more [...]
04/17/13

Interview: Silent Film Historian Steve Joyce

If you've been around the Internet long enough, you quickly learn that every genre and era of the cinema has its fans, and if you're curious enough to read up on them, you learn to appreciate just why they have gained their adherents. For those curious about fantastic cinema of the silent era, an indispensable new book, American Silent Horror, Science Fiction and Fantasy Feature Films, 1913-1929, provides what is not just to date the most comprehensive collection of original reviews of American Read more [...]
01/22/13

Interview: Dave Sindelar of Fantastic Film Musings and Ramblings

There are numerous film review sites on the Internet specializing in science fiction and fantasy cinema, but few are as ambitious or as comprehensive as that of Dave Sindelar. For more than a decade now, he has been watching one movie a day in the science fiction, horror or fantasy genre, accumulating more than four thousand reviews in the process, from the very first years of the cinema (date of release of the oldest film: 1895) to the early 1980s, from all around the world. The sheer breadth of Read more [...]
11/12/12

Seductive Beasts: The Female Werewolf in Victorian Literature

      The most exotic and interesting of all werewolves  must be the female werewolf. While the she-wolf is rare in any period's literature, she does appear in the Victorian period quite a few times. Her appearance in literature is much rarer than in the oral history of lycanthropy which is full of women changing into wolves at night. When she does appear the she-wolf is often a sexual beast. She uses her dual nature and female charms to ensnare her prey. She is also a vehicle for at least Read more [...]
10/25/12

The Beetle: A Forgotten Classic

The Beetle was first published in March of 1897 in the literary magazine “Answers” as a serial story under the name “The Peril of Paul Lessingham: The Story of a Haunted Man”. Written by the enigmatic Richard Marsh the Serial ran for fifteen weeks and was initially targeted at a lower class audience. Then in September of 1897 the serial was repackaged as a novel and refined for the middle and upper middle class. The name was changed to reflect the tastes of this new audience and the novel Read more [...]
10/19/12

Dracula Returns to TV on NBC

Daniel Knauf creator of Carnivàle will be bringing the Dracula legend back to life for NBC in a new ten part series starring Jonathan Rhys Meyers as the undead Count. Knauf has stated his Dracula will be true to the original monster and will not be one of the current brand of metrosexual, whining, fang boys. I look forward to Mr. Knauf's vision. As a student of Gothic horror, Dracula is one of my favorite Victorian novels right after The Beetle....... Mr. Knauf if you are reading this we need Read more [...]
10/18/12

Aliens and Serial Killers: The New Season of American Horror Story

Spoilers...... I can't tell you how much I enjoyed the first season of American Horror Story. The show is brilliant. As much as I would probably hate the politics of the show runners Ryan Murphy and Brad Falchuk I can give them a pass simply because they are masterful storytellers. If you know anything about me you know that for me story is the most important aspect of any entertainment endeavor. So last season was a masterpiece of the storyteller's art. We have been promised that each season will Read more [...]